Hyperreflexia, and Urinary incontinence

Diseases related with Hyperreflexia and Urinary incontinence

In the following list you will find some of the most common rare diseases related to Hyperreflexia and Urinary incontinence that can help you solving undiagnosed cases.

Top matches:

Early-onset Lafora body disease is an extremely rare, inherited form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy characterized by progressive myoclonus epilepsy and Lafora bodies, with an early onset (at around 5 years) and a prolonged disease course. Other manifestations include progressive dysarthria, ataxia, cognitive decline, psychosis, dementia, spasticity, dysarthria, myoclonus, and ataxia. The disease course typically extends for several decades.

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Ataxia
  • Spasticity
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Dysarthria


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about EARLY-ONSET LAFORA BODY DISEASE

A substantial minority of degenerative dementias, perhaps 10%, lack the distinctive pathologic features that allow subclassification as Alzheimer disease (see {104300}) or other forms of dementia. In perhaps half of these cases of nonspecific dementia, there is a positive family history of dementia, with an apparent autosomal dominant mode of inheritance.See also frontotemporal lobe dementia (FLDEM ), which maps to chromosome 17 and is caused by mutation in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT ).

FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, CHROMOSOME 3-LINKED; FTD3 Is also known as dem|dementia, familial nonspecific|dmt1

Related symptoms:

  • Hyperreflexia
  • Gait disturbance
  • Dystonia
  • Cerebral atrophy
  • Babinski sign


SOURCES: OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, CHROMOSOME 3-LINKED; FTD3

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 19 (SCA19) is a very rare subtype of type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I; see this term). It is characterized by mild cerebellar ataxia, cognitive impairment, low scores on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test measuring executive function, myoclonus, and postural tremor.

SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA TYPE 19/22 Is also known as sca19/22

Related symptoms:

  • Ataxia
  • Nystagmus
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Dysarthria
  • Cerebellar atrophy


SOURCES: ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA TYPE 19/22

Other less relevant matches:

Childhood-onset neurodegeneration with ataxia, dystonia, and gaze palsy is an autosomal recessive progressive disorder characterized by onset of gait ataxia, cognitive decline, and gaze palsy in the first or second decades. Additional features include dysarthria, dystonia, and athetoid movements. Some patients may become wheelchair-bound as young adults (summary by Haack et al., 2016).

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Hearing impairment
  • Ataxia
  • Nystagmus
  • Hyperreflexia


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about NEURODEGENERATION WITH ATAXIA, DYSTONIA, AND GAZE PALSY, CHILDHOOD-ONSET; NADGP

AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 13 Is also known as spg13

Related symptoms:

  • Hearing impairment
  • Scoliosis
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Babinski sign
  • Pes cavus


SOURCES: OMIM MESH ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 13

Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 73 is a pure form of hereditary spastic paraplegia characterized by adult onset of crural spastic paraparesis, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar responses, proximal muscle weakness, mild muscle atrophy, decreased vibration sensation at ankles, and mild urinary dysfunction. Foot deformities have been reported to eventually occur in some patients. No abnormalities are noted on brain magnetic resonance imaging and peripheral nerve conduction velocity studies.

AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 73 Is also known as spg73

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Muscle weakness
  • Spasticity
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Skeletal muscle atrophy


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 73

Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 36 (SPG36) is a complex form of hereditary spastic paraplegia, characterized by an onset in childhood or adulthood of progressive spastic paraplegia (with spastic gait, spasticity, lower limb weakness, pes cavus and urinary urgency) associated with the additional manifestation of peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy.

AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 36 Is also known as spg36

Related symptoms:

  • Strabismus
  • Spasticity
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Babinski sign


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 36

Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 6 (SPG6) is a form of hereditary spastic paraplegia which usually presents in late adolescence or early adulthood as a pure phenotype of lower limb spasticity with hyperreflexia and extensor plantar responses, as well as mild bladder disturbances and pes cavus. Rarely, it can present as a complex phenotype with additional manifestations including epilepsy, variable peripheral neuropathy and/or memory impairment.

AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 6 Is also known as spg6|familial spastic paraplegia, autosomal dominant, 3|fsp3

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Spasticity
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Skeletal muscle atrophy
  • Tremor


SOURCES: MESH ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 6

Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 37 is a pure form of hereditary spastic paraplegia characterized by a childhood- to adulthood-onset of slowly progressive spastic gait, extensor plantar responses, brisk tendon reflexes in arms and legs, decreased vibration sense at ankles and urinary dysfunction. Ankle clonus is also reported in some patients.

AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 37 Is also known as spg37

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Fatigue
  • Babinski sign
  • Difficulty walking


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA TYPE 37

Related symptoms:

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Skeletal muscle atrophy
  • Tremor
  • Babinski sign


SOURCES: OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about PARKINSON DISEASE 7, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE EARLY-ONSET; PARK7

Top 5 symptoms//phenotypes associated to Hyperreflexia and Urinary incontinence

Symptoms // Phenotype % cases
Babinski sign Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Seizures Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases
Spastic paraplegia Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases
Lower limb muscle weakness Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases
Lower limb spasticity Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases

Other less frequent symptoms

Patients with Hyperreflexia and Urinary incontinence. may also develop some of the following symptoms:

Uncommon Symptoms - Between 30% and 50% cases

Spastic gait Urinary urgency Impaired vibration sensation in the lower limbs Paraplegia Dementia Spasticity Skeletal muscle atrophy Impaired vibratory sensation Progressive spastic paraplegia Degeneration of the lateral corticospinal tracts Pes cavus Ataxia Difficulty walking Abnormal pyramidal sign Tremor Mental deterioration Dysarthria

Rare Symptoms - Less than 30% cases

Progressive pes cavus Abnormal lower-limb motor evoked potentials Clonus Postural tremor Lower limb hyperreflexia Hearing impairment Limb muscle weakness Myoclonus Parkinsonism EMG abnormality Nystagmus Proximal muscle weakness Confusion Cerebellar atrophy Mutism Aggressive behavior Rigidity Hyperreflexia in upper limbs Urinary bladder sphincter dysfunction Limb ataxia Dystonia Gait disturbance Abnormality of the cerebrospinal fluid Arthritis Peripheral neuropathy Strabismus Behavioral abnormality Progressive spastic paraparesis Distal lower limb muscle weakness Distal lower limb amyotrophy Abnormality of the foot Muscle weakness Falls Distal muscle weakness Paranoia Sensory neuropathy Ankle clonus Psychotic episodes Blepharospasm Resting tremor Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Fasciculations Bradykinesia Anxiety Respiratory failure Cognitive impairment Spinal cord lesion Upper limb spasticity Muscle cramps Impaired distal vibration sensation Fatigue Limitation of movement at ankles Limited hip movement Generalized tonic-clonic seizures Abnormal brainstem MRI signal intensity Impaired distal tactile sensation Demyelinating sensory neuropathy Demyelinating motor neuropathy Impaired distal proprioception Progressive cerebellar ataxia Impaired temperature sensation Tetraplegia Scoliosis Generalized myoclonic seizures Frontotemporal dementia Frontal release signs Hyperorality Dyscalculia Perseveration Inappropriate behavior Dysgraphia Disinhibition Astrocytosis Orofacial dyskinesia Senile plaques Loss of speech Lack of insight Restlessness Global brain atrophy Alzheimer disease Personality changes Apathy Stereotypy Neuronal loss in central nervous system Memory impairment Cerebral cortical atrophy Spastic ataxia Cerebral atrophy Frontal cortical atrophy Hyporeflexia Spastic tetraplegia Dysmetria Psychosis Rod-cone dystrophy Frequent falls Lafora bodies Vertical supranuclear gaze palsy Athetosis Dysdiadochokinesis Oculomotor apraxia Apraxia Neurodegeneration Unsteady gait Gait ataxia Spastic tetraparesis Hallucinations Impaired vibration sensation at ankles Cogwheel rigidity Impaired smooth pursuit Poor coordination Slurred speech Truncal ataxia Diplopia Broad-based gait Postural instability Ophthalmoplegia Bulimia


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