Hepatomegaly, and Hemolytic anemia

Diseases related with Hepatomegaly and Hemolytic anemia

In the following list you will find some of the most common rare diseases related to Hepatomegaly and Hemolytic anemia that can help you solving undiagnosed cases.

Top matches:

In dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHS), also known as hereditary xerocytosis, red blood cells exhibit altered intracellular cation content and cellular dehydration, resulting in increased erythrocyte mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and decreased erythrocyte osmotic fragility. Blood films show various cell shape abnormalities, the most characteristic being the stomatocyte, with a straight or crescent-shaped central pallor (summary by Rapetti-Mauss et al., 2015).For discussion of clinical and genetic heterogeneity of the stomatocytoses, see DHS1 (OMIM ).

DEHYDRATED HEREDITARY STOMATOCYTOSIS 2; DHS2 Is also known as desiccytosis gardos|xerocytosis gardos

Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Splenomegaly
  • Jaundice
  • Hepatosplenomegaly


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about DEHYDRATED HEREDITARY STOMATOCYTOSIS 2; DHS2

Related symptoms:

  • Growth delay
  • Anemia
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Fever
  • Proteinuria


SOURCES: OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about HEME OXYGENASE 1 DEFICIENCY; HMOX1D

Medium match ALPHA-THALASSEMIA

Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Fatigue
  • Splenomegaly
  • Jaundice


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about ALPHA-THALASSEMIA

Other less relevant matches:

Hemoglobin H disease is a subtype of alpha-thalassemia (see {604131}) in which patients have compound heterozygosity for alpha(+)-thalassemia, caused by deletion of one alpha-globin gene, and for alpha(0)-thalassemia, caused by deletion in cis of 2 alpha-globin genes (summary by Lal et al., 2011). When 3 alpha-globin genes become inactive because of deletions with or without concomitant nondeletional mutations, the affected individual has only 1 functional alpha-globin gene. These people usually have moderate anemia and marked microcytosis and hypochromia. In affected adults, there is an excess of beta-globin chains within erythrocytes that will form beta-4 tetramers, also known as hemoglobin H (summary by Chui et al., 2003).Hb H disease is usually caused by the combination of alpha(0)-thalassemia with deletional alpha(+)-thalassemia, a combination referred to as 'deletional' Hb H disease. In a smaller proportion of patients, Hb H disease is caused by an alpha(0)-thalassemia plus an alpha(+)-thalassemia point mutation or small insertion/deletion. Such a situation is labeled 'nondeletional' Hb H disease. Patients with nondeletional Hb H disease are usually more anemic, more symptomatic, more prone to have significant hepatosplenomegaly, and more likely to require transfusions (summary by Lal et al., 2011).While most thalassemia-related hydrops fetalis is caused by the lack of all alpha-globin genes, there are reports of fetuses with Hb H disease that developed the hydrops fetalis syndrome; see {236750}.

HEMOGLOBIN H DISEASE; HBH Is also known as alpha-thalassemia, hemoglobin h type|hemoglobin h disease, deletional

Related symptoms:

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Anemia
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Edema
  • Splenomegaly


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about HEMOGLOBIN H DISEASE; HBH

Neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis due to citrin deficiency is a mild subtype of citrin deficiency (see this term) characterized clinically by low birth weight, failure to thrive, transient intrahepatic cholestasis, multiple aminoacidemia, galactosemia, hypoproteinemia, hepatomegaly, decreased coagulation factors, hemolytic anemia, variable but mostly mild liver dysfunction, and hypoglycemia.

NEONATAL INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS DUE TO CITRIN DEFICIENCY Is also known as cholestasis, neonatal intrahepatic, caused by citrin deficiency|neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency|citrullinemia, type ii, neonatal-onset, with or without failure to thrive and dyslipidemia|niccd

Related symptoms:

  • Global developmental delay
  • Growth delay
  • Failure to thrive
  • Anemia
  • Hepatomegaly


SOURCES: MESH OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about NEONATAL INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS DUE TO CITRIN DEFICIENCY

Lymphoproliferative syndrome-1 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset in early childhood of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated immune dysregulation, manifest as lymphoma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, Hodgkin disease, and/or hypogammaglobulinemia. Autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia or renal disease, may also occur. Patients show a high EBV viral load and decreased invariant natural killer T cells. It is unknown whether patients with ITK mutations are intrinsically susceptible to development of lymphoma or dysgammaglobulinemia in the absence of EBV infection (summary by Stepensky et al., 2011; Linka et al., 2012).For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (OMIM ).

Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Fever
  • Splenomegaly
  • Immunodeficiency


SOURCES: OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE SYNDROME 1; LPFS1

Vitamin B12-unresponsive methylmalonic acidemia type mut0 is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by recurrent ketoacidotic comas or transient vomiting, dehydration, hypotonia and intellectual deficit, which does not respond to administration of vitamin B12.

VITAMIN B12-UNRESPONSIVE METHYLMALONIC ACIDEMIA TYPE MUT0 Is also known as complete deficiency of methylmalonyl-coa mutase|vitamin b12-unresponsive methylmalonic aciduria type mut0

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Global developmental delay
  • Growth delay
  • Muscular hypotonia
  • Anemia


SOURCES: ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about VITAMIN B12-UNRESPONSIVE METHYLMALONIC ACIDEMIA TYPE MUT0

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to CTLA4 haploinsuffiency is a rare, primary immunodeficiency characterized by variable combination of enteropathy, hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent respiratory infections, granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease, lymphocytic infiltration of non-lymphoid organs (intestine, lung, brain, bone marrow, kidney), autoimmune thrombocytopenia or neutropenia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and lymphadenopathy.

AUTOIMMUNE LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE SYNDROME DUE TO CTLA4 HAPLOINSUFFIENCY Is also known as alps due to ctla4 haploinsuffiency|chai|ctla4 haploinsufficiency with autoimmune infiltration|ctla-4 haploinsufficiency with autoimmune infiltration disease

Related symptoms:

  • Hepatomegaly
  • Diarrhea
  • Splenomegaly
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Recurrent infections


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about AUTOIMMUNE LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE SYNDROME DUE TO CTLA4 HAPLOINSUFFIENCY

Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHS), also known as hereditary xerocytosis, is an autosomal dominant hemolytic anemia characterized by primary erythrocyte dehydration. DHS erythrocytes exhibit decreased total cation and potassium content that are not accompanied by a proportional net gain of sodium and water. DHS patients typically exhibit mild to moderate compensated hemolytic anemia, with an increased erythrocyte mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and a decreased osmotic fragility, both of which reflect cellular dehydration (summary by Zarychanski et al., 2012). Patients may also show perinatal edema and pseudohyperkalemia due to loss of K+ from red cells stored at room temperature. A minor proportion of red cells appear as stomatocytes on blood films. Complications such as splenomegaly and cholelithiasis, resulting from increased red cell trapping in the spleen and elevated bilirubin levels, respectively, may occur. The course of DHS is frequently associated with iron overload, which may lead to hepatosiderosis (summary by Albuisson et al., 2013).Dehydrated red blood cells, including those from hereditary xerocytosis patients, show delayed infection rates to Plasmodium in vitro, suggesting a potential protective mechanism against malaria (Tiffert et al., 2005). A polymorphism in PIEZO1 that is enriched in populations of African descent and results in xerocytosis conferred resistance to Plasmodium infection in vitro (see {611184.0016}).The 'leaky red blood cells' in familial pseudohyperkalemia show a temperature-dependent loss of potassium when stored at room temperature, manifesting as apparent hyperkalemia. The red blood cells show a reduced life span in vivo, but there is no frank hemolysis. Studies of cation content and transport show a marginal increase in permeability at 37 degrees C and a degree of cellular dehydration, qualitatively similar to the changes seen in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. Physiologic studies show that the passive leak of potassium has an abnormal temperature dependence, such that the leak is less sensitive to temperature than that in normal cells (summary by Iolascon et al., 1999).Carella et al. (2004) noted that 3 clinical forms of pseudohyperkalemia unassociated with hematologic manifestations, based predominantly on the leak-temperature dependence curve, had been reported: (1) pseudohyperkalemia Edinburgh, in which the curve has a shallow slope; (2) pseudohyperkalemia Chiswick or Falkirk (see {609153}), in which the curve is shouldered; and (3) pseudohyperkalemia Cardiff (see {609153}), in which the temperature dependence of the leak shows a 'U-shaped' profile with a minimum at 23 degrees C. Gore et al. (2004) stated that potassium-flux temperature profiles are consistent both from year to year in an individual as well as consistent within affected members of a pedigree. Genetic Heterogeneity of Hereditary StomatocytosisDehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis-2 (DHS2 ) is caused by mutation in the KCNN4 gene (OMIM ) on chromosome 19q13. Another form of stomatocytosis, involving familial pseudohyperkalemia with minimal hematologic abnormalities (PSHK2 ), is caused by mutation in the ABCB6 gene (OMIM ) on chromosome 2q35. Cryohydrocytosis (CHC ) is caused by mutation in the SLC4A1 gene (OMIM ) on chromosome 17q21, and stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis with neurologic defects (SDCHCN ) is caused by mutation in the SLC2A1 gene (OMIM ) on chromosome 1p34. An overhydrated form of hereditary stomatocytosis (OHST ) is caused by mutation in the RHAG gene (OMIM ) on chromosome 6p12.See {137280} for a discussion of the association of familial stomatocytosis and hypertrophic gastritis in the dog, an autosomal recessive syndrome. ReviewsDelaunay (2004) reviewed genetic disorders of red cell membrane permeability to monovalent cations, noting 'inevitable' overlap between entities based on clinical phenotype.Bruce (2009) provided a review of hereditary stomatocytosis and cation-leaky red cells, stating that consistent features include hemolytic anemia, a monovalent cation leak, and changes in red cell morphology that appear to follow a continuum, from normal discocyte to stomatocyte to echinocyte in DHS, and from discocyte to stomatocyte to spherocyte to fragmentation in OHST. Bruce (2009) suggested that the underlying pathologic mechanism might involve misfolded mutant proteins that escape the quality control system of the cell and reach the red cell membrane, where they disrupt the red cell membrane structure and cause a cation leak that alters the hydration of the red cell, thereby changing the morphology and viability of the cell.King and Zanella (2013) provided an overview of 2 groups of nonimmune hereditary red cell membrane disorders caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane: red cell cytoskeleton disorders, including hereditary spherocytosis (see {182900}), hereditary elliptocytosis (see {611804}), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (OMIM ); and cation permeability disorders of the red cell membrane, or hereditary stomatocytoses, including DHS, OHST, CHC, and PSHK. The authors noted that because there is no specific screening test for the hereditary stomatocytoses, a preliminary diagnosis is based on the presence of a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature- or time-dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. King et al. (2015) reported the International Council for Standardization in Haematology (ICSH) guidelines for laboratory diagnosis of nonimmune hereditary red cell membrane disorders.

DEHYDRATED HEREDITARY STOMATOCYTOSIS 1 WITH OR WITHOUT PSEUDOHYPERKALEMIA AND/OR PERINATAL EDEMA; DHS1 Is also known as pseudohyperkalemia, familial, 1, due to red cell leak|pshk1|dhs|dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis|xerocytosis, hereditary|desiccytosis, hereditary|pseudohyperkalemia edinburgh

Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Edema


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about DEHYDRATED HEREDITARY STOMATOCYTOSIS 1 WITH OR WITHOUT PSEUDOHYPERKALEMIA AND/OR PERINATAL EDEMA; DHS1

Glycogen storage disease due to aldolase A deficiency is an extremely rare glycogen storage disease (see this term) characterized by hemolytic anemia with or without myopathy or intellectual deficit. Myopathy can be severe enough to result in fatal rhabdomyolysis in some patients. A family with episodic rhabdomyolysis (triggerd by fever) without hemolytic anemia has recently been reported.

GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE DUE TO ALDOLASE A DEFICIENCY Is also known as glycogenosis type xii|red cell aldolase deficiency|gsd type xii|gsd type 12|gsd xii|aldolase deficiency, red cell|aldoa deficiency|gsd due to aldolase a deficiency|glycogen storage disease type 12|glycogenosis type 12|glycogen storage disease type xii|gly

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Short stature
  • Growth delay
  • Muscle weakness
  • Ptosis


SOURCES: MESH OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE DUE TO ALDOLASE A DEFICIENCY

Top 5 symptoms//phenotypes associated to Hepatomegaly and Hemolytic anemia

Symptoms // Phenotype % cases
Anemia Very Common - Between 80% and 100% cases
Splenomegaly Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Jaundice Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Growth delay Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases
Cholelithiasis Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases

Other less frequent symptoms

Patients with Hepatomegaly and Hemolytic anemia. may also develop some of the following symptoms:

Uncommon Symptoms - Between 30% and 50% cases

Fatigue Hyperbilirubinemia Thrombocytopenia Pallor Fever Hepatosplenomegaly

Rare Symptoms - Less than 30% cases

Pneumonia Global developmental delay Abnormality of the liver Hepatitis Immunodeficiency Lymphopenia Recurrent infections Lymphadenopathy Ascites Decreased antibody level in blood Reduced alpha/beta synthesis ratio Pericardial effusion Intellectual disability Respiratory tract infection Spherocytosis Edema Autoimmune hemolytic anemia Increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration Normocytic anemia Prolonged neonatal jaundice Stomatocytosis Reticulocytosis Dehydration Chronic hemolytic anemia Delayed puberty Impaired T cell function Verrucae Decreased proportion of CD4-positive T cells Autoimmune thrombocytopenia Thyroiditis Interstitial pulmonary abnormality Psoriasiform dermatitis Respiratory failure Recurrent upper respiratory tract infections Hypochromic microcytic anemia Abnormal intestine morphology Elevated hepatic transaminase Eczema Arthritis Recurrent respiratory infections Diarrhea Renal tubular dysfunction Hemiplegia/hemiparesis Hyperammonemia Pancreatitis Choreoathetosis Chorea Sepsis Coma Neutropenia Abnormal lung morphology Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Muscular dystrophy Increased intracellular sodium Increased muscle fatiguability Cholecystitis Nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia Rhabdomyolysis Low posterior hairline Myopathy Short neck Epicanthus Ptosis Muscle weakness Short stature Increased red cell hemolysis by shear stress Exercise-induced hemolysis Recurrent thromboembolism Lethargy Pyropoikilocytosis Schistocytosis Compensated hemolytic anemia Portal vein thrombosis Antiphospholipid antibody positivity Hemoglobinuria Intermittent jaundice Gastritis Elliptocytosis Generalized edema Esophageal varix Increased serum ferritin Thromboembolism Hyperkalemia Nausea and vomiting Optic atrophy Renal insufficiency Abnormality of the nervous system Intrahepatic cholestasis Abnormality of lipid metabolism Hypercholesterolemia Hepatic fibrosis Decreased liver function Cholestasis Hypertriglyceridemia Proteinuria Hepatic steatosis Cirrhosis Small for gestational age Skin rash Hypoglycemia Decreased HDL cholesterol concentration Failure to thrive Hematuria Hemoglobin H Hypersplenism Abnormal hemoglobin Decreased mean corpuscular volume Abnormality of immune system physiology Microcytic anemia Myelodysplasia Hydrops fetalis Asplenia Cognitive impairment Poor appetite Hypoproteinemia Hypergalactosemia Dystonia Lymphoproliferative disorder Respiratory distress Dark urine Muscular hypotonia Macrocytic anemia Dysgammaglobulinemia Generalized lymphadenopathy Granulomatosis Hemophagocytosis Histiocytosis Recurrent aphthous stomatitis Stomatitis Immune dysregulation Pulmonary infiltrates Giant cell hepatitis IgG deficiency Hodgkin lymphoma Increased mean corpuscular volume Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate Pleural effusion Acanthocytosis Pancytopenia Lymphoma Autoimmunity Congenital hemolytic anemia Anisopoikilocytosis Elevated plasma citrulline Hypermethioninemia Normochromic anemia


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