Edema, and Squamous cell carcinoma

Diseases related with Edema and Squamous cell carcinoma

In the following list you will find some of the most common rare diseases related to Edema and Squamous cell carcinoma that can help you solving undiagnosed cases.

Top matches:

Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a complex group of hereditary syndromes that have been classified into diffuse, punctate, and focal forms according to the pattern of hyperkeratosis on the palms and soles (Lucker et al., 1994).For a discussion of phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of palmoplantar keratoderma, see epidermolytic PPK (OMIM ).

PALMOPLANTAR KERATODERMA-ESOPHAGEAL CARCINOMA SYNDROME Is also known as howell-evans syndrome|keratosis palmaris et plantaris with esophageal cancer|palmoplantar hyperkeratosis-esophageal carcinoma syndrome|palmoplantar keratoderma with esophageal cancer|tylosis-oesophageal carcinoma syndrome|bennion-patterson syndrome|kerato

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Hepatomegaly
  • Dysphagia
  • Edema
  • Hernia


SOURCES: MESH ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about PALMOPLANTAR KERATODERMA-ESOPHAGEAL CARCINOMA SYNDROME

Hailey-Hailey disease, also known as benign chronic pemphigus, is a rare autosomal dominant cutaneous disorder that usually becomes manifest in the third or fourth decade of life with erythema, vesicles, and erosions involving the body folds, particularly the groin and axillary regions. Other sites of the body, such as the neck, perianal, and submammary regions, may likewise be affected (summary by Poblete-Gutierrez et al., 2004).This disorder was first described by the dermatologist brothers Hailey and Hailey (1939).

BENIGN CHRONIC PEMPHIGUS; BCPM Is also known as hhd|hailey-hailey disease|pemphigus, benign familial

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Short stature
  • Growth delay
  • Neoplasm
  • Pain


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about BENIGN CHRONIC PEMPHIGUS; BCPM

Junctional epidermolysis bullosa, Herlitz-type is a severe subtype of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB, see this term) characterized by blisters and extensive erosions, localized to the skin and mucous membranes.

JUNCTIONAL EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA, GENERALIZED SEVERE Is also known as epidermolysis bullosa letalis|junctional epidermolysis bullosa, herlitz type|junctional epidermolysis bullosa, herlitz-pearson type|jeb-herlitz type|jeb-h|epidermolysis bullosa junctionalis, herlitz type|epidermolysis bullosa, junctional, herlitz-pearson

Related symptoms:

  • Failure to thrive
  • Anemia
  • Feeding difficulties
  • Respiratory insufficiency
  • Syndactyly


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about JUNCTIONAL EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA, GENERALIZED SEVERE

Other less relevant matches:

Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease prevalent in many tropical and subtropical regions caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. It is the third most frequent mycobacterial disease in humans worldwide, after tuberculosis (OMIM ) and leprosy (OMIM ). Lesions are most common on exposed parts of the body, especially the limbs. Buruli ulcer derives its name from a county in Uganda, East Africa, north of Kampala, where the disease was found in the late 1950s in hundreds of people living near marshes and riverine areas near the Nile River (Clancey et al., 1961; Barker, 1971). The disease was first described in the medical literature in 1948 in a report on patients in Australia (MacCallum et al., 1948). Patients have also been reported from tropical areas in Latin America and Asia (Stienstra et al., 2006; van der Werf et al., 2005).

BURULI ULCER, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO Is also known as mycobacterium ulcerans, susceptibility to

Related symptoms:

  • Edema


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about BURULI ULCER, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO

Cancer of the head and neck that begins in squamous cells (thin, flat cells that form the surface of the skin, eyes, various internal organs, and the lining of hollow organs and ducts of some glands). Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck includes cancers of the nasal cavity, sinuses, lips, mouth, salivary glands, throat, and larynx (voice box). Most head and neck cancers are squamous cell carcinomas.

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Carcinoma
  • Squamous cell carcinoma


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA, HEAD AND NECK; HNSCC

Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is the most common form of porokeratosis characterized by the presence of several small annular plaques with a distinctive keratotic rim found most commonly on sun-exposed areas of the skin, particularly the extremities.

DISSEMINATED SUPERFICIAL ACTINIC POROKERATOSIS Is also known as porokeratosis, disseminated superficial actinic, 2|dsap2

Related symptoms:

  • Carcinoma
  • Pruritus
  • Cutaneous photosensitivity
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Porokeratosis


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about DISSEMINATED SUPERFICIAL ACTINIC POROKERATOSIS

Low match CERVICAL CANCER

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The virus spreads through sexual contact. Most women's bodies are able to fight HPV infection. But sometimes the virus leads to cancer. You're at higher risk if you smoke, have had many children, use birth control pills for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, you may have pelvic pain or bleeding from the vagina. It usually takes several years for normal cells in the cervix to turn into cancer cells. Your health care provider can find abnormal cells by doing a Pap test to examine cells from the cervix. You may also have an HPV test. If your results are abnormal, you may need a biopsy or other tests. By getting regular screenings, you can find and treat any problems before they turn into cancer. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination. The choice of treatment depends on the size of the tumor, whether the cancer has spread and whether you would like to become pregnant someday. Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Carcinoma
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Papilloma
  • Abnormality of the cervical spine


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about CERVICAL CANCER

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare inherited genodermatosis characterized by chronic infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) leading to polymorphous cutaneous lesions and high risk of developing non melanoma skin cancer.

EPIDERMODYSPLASIA VERRUCIFORMIS Is also known as lutz-lewandowsky epidermodysplasia verruciformis|lewandowsky-lutz syndrome

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Abnormality of metabolism/homeostasis
  • Papule
  • Neoplasm of the skin
  • Hypopigmented skin patches


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about EPIDERMODYSPLASIA VERRUCIFORMIS

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Carcinoma
  • Breast carcinoma
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Ovarian neoplasm


SOURCES: OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about COLORECTAL CANCER, HEREDITARY NONPOLYPOSIS, TYPE 4; HNPCC4

Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a chronic, progressive disease that alters the fibroelasticity of the oral submucosa, prevalent in India and Southeast Asia but rare elsewhere, and characterized by burning and pain in the oral cavity, loss of gustatory sensation, the presence of blanched fibrous bands and stiffening of the oral mucosa and oro-pharynx (leading to trismus and a progressive reduction in mouth opening) and an increased risk of developing oral squamous cell cancer (3-19%). It is usually associated with the chewing of the areca nut (an ingredient in betel quid) but the exact etiology is unknown and there is currently no effective treatment.

ORAL SUBMUCOUS FIBROSIS Is also known as osmf

Related symptoms:

  • Flexion contracture
  • Narrow mouth
  • Trismus
  • Cheilitis
  • Abnormality of the pharynx


SOURCES: MESH ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about ORAL SUBMUCOUS FIBROSIS

Top 5 symptoms//phenotypes associated to Edema and Squamous cell carcinoma

Symptoms // Phenotype % cases
Neoplasm Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Carcinoma Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Recurrent skin infections Rare - less than 30% cases
Osteoporosis Rare - less than 30% cases
Alopecia Rare - less than 30% cases

Other less frequent symptoms

Patients with Edema and Squamous cell carcinoma. may also develop some of the following symptoms:

Rare Symptoms - Less than 30% cases

Narrow mouth Esophageal stricture Abnormal blistering of the skin Cutaneous photosensitivity Feeding difficulties Hyperkeratosis Basal cell carcinoma Nail dysplasia Pyloric stenosis Milia Atrophic scars Aplasia cutis congenita Hoarse voice Hypoplasia of dental enamel Onycholysis Dehydration Nail dystrophy Sepsis Carious teeth Hypotrichosis Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin Dilated cardiomyopathy Dyspnea Respiratory failure Syndactyly Respiratory insufficiency Anemia Failure to thrive Acrokeratosis Lamellar cataract Acantholysis Ankyloglossia Laryngeal stridor Skin erosion Ovarian carcinoma Verrucae Seborrheic dermatitis Skin plaque Verruca plana Breast carcinoma Ovarian neoplasm Endometrial carcinoma Abnormality of the immune system Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma Flexion contracture Trismus Cheilitis Abnormality of the pharynx Abnormal oral cavity morphology Pustule Multiple cafe-au-lait spots Laryngeal stenosis Porokeratosis Paronychia Poikiloderma Congenital localized absence of skin Mitten deformity Junctional split Pruritus Papilloma Telangiectasia of the skin Abnormality of the cervical spine Cervical polyp Abnormality of metabolism/homeostasis Papule Neoplasm of the skin Hypopigmented skin patches Concave nasal ridge Melanoma Osteosarcoma Poor appetite Esophageal neoplasm Diffuse palmoplantar hyperkeratosis Abnormality of the mediastinum Clubbing of toes Plantar hyperkeratosis Stomach cancer Hypergranulosis Oral leukoplakia Follicular hyperkeratosis Esophagitis Hiatus hernia Abnormality of the mouth Parakeratosis Oral-pharyngeal dysphagia Abnormality of esophagus physiology Poor suck Palmoplantar hyperkeratosis Thickened skin Epidermal acanthosis Gastrointestinal hemorrhage Ectodermal dysplasia Ascites Postural instability Palmoplantar keratoderma Nausea and vomiting Gastroesophageal reflux Weight loss Hernia Dysphagia Esophageal carcinoma Abnormal large intestine morphology Alopecia of scalp Erythema Severe vision loss Striae distensae Erythroderma Hepatomegaly Telangiectasia Sparse scalp hair Eczema Overgrowth Hypopigmentation of the skin Abnormality of skin pigmentation Leukemia Skin rash Sparse hair Postnatal growth retardation Esophageal leukoplakia Osteopenia Hypogonadism Hyperhidrosis Prominent forehead Abnormality of the dentition Diarrhea Vomiting Frontal bossing Visual impairment Cataract Pain Growth delay Short stature Intellectual disability Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma


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