Dysarthria, and Psychosis

Diseases related with Dysarthria and Psychosis

In the following list you will find some of the most common rare diseases related to Dysarthria and Psychosis that can help you solving undiagnosed cases.

Top matches:

Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult onset of progressive neuropsychiatric and movement disorders, although some patients remain asymptomatic. Clinical features can include dystonia, parkinsonism, gait abnormalities, psychosis, dementia, and chorea. Brain imaging shows calcifications of the basal ganglia and other brain regions (summary by Legati et al., 2015).For a detailed phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of IBGC, see IBGC1 (OMIM ).

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dysarthria
  • Gait disturbance
  • Behavioral abnormality


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about BASAL GANGLIA CALCIFICATION, IDIOPATHIC, 6; IBGC6

Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification-5 (IBGC5) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive neurologic symptoms that are associated with brain calcifications mainly affecting the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in the thalamus, cerebellum, or white matter. Affected individuals have motor symptoms, such as dyskinesias or parkinsonism, headache, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric manifestations, including apathy and depression. Some patients are asymptomatic. The age at symptom onset ranges from late childhood to adulthood; the disorder is progressive (summary by Keller et al., 2013).For a detailed phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of IBGC, see IBGC1 (OMIM ).

Related symptoms:

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dysarthria
  • Gait disturbance
  • Dystonia
  • Headache


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about BASAL GANGLIA CALCIFICATION, IDIOPATHIC, 5; IBGC5

Early-onset Lafora body disease is an extremely rare, inherited form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy characterized by progressive myoclonus epilepsy and Lafora bodies, with an early onset (at around 5 years) and a prolonged disease course. Other manifestations include progressive dysarthria, ataxia, cognitive decline, psychosis, dementia, spasticity, dysarthria, myoclonus, and ataxia. The disease course typically extends for several decades.

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Ataxia
  • Spasticity
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Dysarthria


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about EARLY-ONSET LAFORA BODY DISEASE

Other less relevant matches:

Parkinson disease-19A is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of parkinsonism in the first or second decade. Some patients may have additional neurologic features, including mental retardation and seizures (summary by Edvardson et al., 2012 and Koroglu et al., 2013).Parkinson disease-19B is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with onset of parkinsonism between the third and fifth decades. It is slowly progressive, shows features similar to classic late-onset Parkinson disease (PD), and has a beneficial response to dopaminergic therapy (Olgiati et al., 2016).For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease, see PD (OMIM ).

PARKINSON DISEASE 19A, JUVENILE-ONSET; PARK19A Is also known as park19, formerly

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Seizures
  • Spasticity
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Hyperreflexia


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about PARKINSON DISEASE 19A, JUVENILE-ONSET; PARK19A

ATYPICAL PANTOTHENATE KINASE-ASSOCIATED NEURODEGENERATION Is also known as neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 1, atypical form|pkan, atypical form|nbia1, atypical form

Related symptoms:

  • Spasticity
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Hyperreflexia
  • Dysarthria
  • Optic atrophy


SOURCES: ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about ATYPICAL PANTOTHENATE KINASE-ASSOCIATED NEURODEGENERATION

ALZHEIMER DISEASE 3; AD Is also known as alzheimer disease, familial, 3|alzheimer disease 3, early-onset

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Ataxia
  • Spasticity
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dysarthria


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about ALZHEIMER DISEASE 3; AD

Medium match LAFORA DISEASE

Lafora disease (LD) is a rare, inherited, severe, progressive myoclonic epilepsy characterized by myoclonus and/or generalized seizures, visual hallucinations (partial occipital seizures), and progressive neurological decline.

LAFORA DISEASE Is also known as epm2a|lafora disease|progressive myoclonus epilepsy type 2|lafora body disease|pme type 2|epilepsy, progressive myoclonic, 2a|melf|epm2|lbd|progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 2

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Ataxia
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dysarthria
  • Gait disturbance


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MESH MENDELIAN

More info about LAFORA DISEASE

SCA17 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by ataxia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, cognitive impairments, psychosis, and seizures. Its clinical phenotype and inheritance pattern are similar to Huntington disease (HD ). Individuals with normal TBP alleles have between 25 and 44 repeats, whereas SCA17 patients have between 47 and 63 repeats. Reduced penetrance is seen with 45 to 46 repeats (summary by Gao et al. (2008)).For a general discussion of autosomal dominant of spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (OMIM ).

SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA 17; SCA17 Is also known as hdl4|huntington disease-like 4

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Seizures
  • Ataxia
  • Spasticity
  • Cognitive impairment


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA 17; SCA17

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), currently the only known form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type 2 (ADCA2; see this term), is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, motor system abnormalities, dysarthria, dysphagia and retinal degeneration leading to progressive blindness.

SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA TYPE 7 Is also known as ataxia with pigmentary retinopathy|sca7|cerebellar syndrome-pigmentary maculopathy syndrome

Related symptoms:

  • Global developmental delay
  • Ataxia
  • Nystagmus
  • Failure to thrive
  • Muscle weakness


SOURCES: ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA TYPE 7

Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 2 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder that usually presents in childhood, but may show later onset, even in adulthood. Affected individuals have motor disability, with ataxia, apraxia, dystonia, and dysarthria, associated with necrotic lesions throughout the brain. Most patients also have cognitive impairment and axonal neuropathy and become severely disabled later in life (summary by Ghezzi et al., 2011). The disorder may present clinically as spinocerebellar ataxia or Leigh syndrome, or with psychiatric disturbances (Morino et al., 2014; Atwal, 2014; Nogueira et al., 2013).For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (OMIM ).

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Global developmental delay
  • Hearing impairment
  • Ataxia
  • Nystagmus


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about MITOCHONDRIAL COMPLEX III DEFICIENCY, NUCLEAR TYPE 2; MC3DN2

Top 5 symptoms//phenotypes associated to Dysarthria and Psychosis

Symptoms // Phenotype % cases
Cognitive impairment Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Seizures Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Dementia Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Ataxia Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Hallucinations Common - Between 50% and 80% cases

Other less frequent symptoms

Patients with Dysarthria and Psychosis. may also develop some of the following symptoms:

Common Symptoms - More than 50% cases

Depressivity

Uncommon Symptoms - Between 30% and 50% cases

Dystonia

Common Symptoms - More than 50% cases

Hyperreflexia

Uncommon Symptoms - Between 30% and 50% cases

Spasticity Parkinsonism Behavioral abnormality Gait disturbance Dysphagia Chorea Abnormal pyramidal sign Mental deterioration Tremor Rigidity Brain atrophy Babinski sign Myoclonus Apraxia Abnormality of extrapyramidal motor function Generalized-onset seizure Intellectual disability Dysmetria Confusion Blindness Bradykinesia Mutism Cerebral atrophy Headache Visual hallucinations Cerebellar atrophy

Rare Symptoms - Less than 30% cases

Delusions Shuffling gait Dysdiadochokinesis Anarthria Lower limb hyperreflexia Basal ganglia calcification Personality changes Visual loss Spastic paraparesis Paraparesis Focal dystonia Muscle weakness Nystagmus Memory impairment Cerebral cortical atrophy Global developmental delay Neurological speech impairment Obsessive-compulsive behavior Ophthalmoplegia Spastic tetraparesis Frequent falls Neuronal loss in central nervous system Inability to walk Paranoia Lafora bodies Gait ataxia Dyskinesia Urinary incontinence Neurodegeneration Generalized myoclonic seizures Progressive cerebellar ataxia Anxiety Aggressive behavior Visual auras Gliosis Abnormal cerebellum morphology Frontal lobe dementia Torticollis Frontal release signs Simple partial occipital seizures Intention tremor Pontocerebellar atrophy Positive Romberg sign Broad-based gait Limb ataxia Alcoholism Abnormality of eye movement Gaze-evoked nystagmus Diffuse cerebral atrophy Orofacial dyskinesia Lack of insight Hearing impairment Olivopontocerebellar atrophy Axonal degeneration Abnormality of mitochondrial metabolism Dysphonia Incoordination Horizontal nystagmus Truncal ataxia Fasciculations Diplopia Peripheral axonal neuropathy Pes cavus Intellectual disability, mild Skeletal muscle atrophy Peripheral neuropathy Abnormal fundus morphology Impaired pursuit initiation and maintenance Hemeralopia Restless legs Generalized tonic-clonic seizures with focal onset Ophthalmoparesis Cone/cone-rod dystrophy Macular degeneration Sensory impairment Neonatal hypotonia Photophobia Reduced visual acuity Congestive heart failure Motor delay Feeding difficulties Failure to thrive Giant somatosensory evoked potentials Spastic gait Vegetative state Encephalopathy Impulsivity Clumsiness Retinopathy Irritability Optic atrophy Hypometric saccades Hypomimic face Resting tremor Global brain atrophy Akinesia Postural instability Intellectual disability, moderate Spastic ataxia Limb dystonia Spastic tetraplegia Tetraplegia Falls Motor tics Athetosis Apathy Migraine Vertigo Palilalia Slurred speech Choreoathetosis Cerebral calcification Emotional lability Upper motor neuron dysfunction Hyperkinesis Dysgraphia Absence seizures Progressive neurologic deterioration Cutaneous photosensitivity Focal-onset seizure Hepatic failure Generalized tonic-clonic seizures Difficulty walking Abnormality of metabolism/homeostasis Optic ataxia Limb apraxia Agnosia Dyscalculia Primitive reflex Oromandibular dystonia Lewy bodies Frontotemporal dementia Neurofibrillary tangles Dysphasia Alzheimer disease Leukoencephalopathy Tetraparesis Paraplegia Abnormality of the cerebral white matter Spastic paraplegia Violent behavior Inertia Tongue atrophy Impaired social interactions


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