Dysarthria, and Gliosis

Diseases related with Dysarthria and Gliosis

In the following list you will find some of the most common rare diseases related to Dysarthria and Gliosis that can help you solving undiagnosed cases.

Top matches:

ATAXIA, SENSORY, 1, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT; SNAX1 Is also known as adsa

Related symptoms:

  • Ataxia
  • Dysarthria
  • Gait disturbance
  • Dysphagia
  • Congestive heart failure


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about ATAXIA, SENSORY, 1, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT; SNAX1

Related symptoms:

  • Ataxia
  • Dysarthria
  • Gait disturbance
  • Cerebral atrophy
  • Depressivity


SOURCES: MESH OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH NEUROPSYCHIATRIC FEATURES

Other less relevant matches:

Medium match PERRY SYNDROME

Perry syndrome is a rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapidly progressive early-onset parkinsonism, central hypoventilation, weight loss, insomnia and depression.

PERRY SYNDROME Is also known as parkinsonism with alveolar hypoventilation and mental depression

Related symptoms:

  • Dysarthria
  • Tremor
  • Respiratory insufficiency
  • Behavioral abnormality
  • Abnormality of metabolism/homeostasis


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about PERRY SYNDROME

Parkinson disease was first described by James Parkinson in 1817. It is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease (AD ), affecting approximately 1% of the population over age 50 (Polymeropoulos et al., 1996). ReviewsWarner and Schapira (2003) reviewed the genetic and environmental causes of Parkinson disease. Feany (2004) reviewed the genetics of Parkinson disease and provided a speculative model of interactions among proteins implicated in PD. Lees et al. (2009) provided a review of Parkinson disease, with emphasis on diagnosis, neuropathology, and treatment. Genetic Heterogeneity of Parkinson DiseaseSeveral loci for autosomal dominant Parkinson disease have been identified, including PARK1 (OMIM ) and PARK4, caused by mutation in or triplication of the alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA ), respectively, on 4q22; PARK5 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the UCHL1 gene on 4p13; PARK8 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the LRRK2 gene (OMIM ) on 12q12; PARK11 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the GIGYF2 gene (OMIM ) on 2q37; PARK13 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the HTRA2 gene (OMIM ) on 2p13; PARK17 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the VPS35 gene (OMIM ) on 16q11; and PARK18 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the EIF4G1 gene (OMIM ) on 3q27.Several loci for autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson disease have been identified: PARK2 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the gene encoding parkin (PARK2 ) on 6q26; PARK6 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the PINK1 gene (OMIM ) on 1p36; PARK7 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the DJ1 gene (PARK7 ) on 1p36; PARK14 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the PLA2G6 gene (OMIM ) on 22q13; PARK15 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the FBXO7 gene (OMIM ) on 22q12-q13; PARK19A (OMIM ) and PARK19B (see {615528}), caused by mutation in the DNAJC6 gene (OMIM ) on 1p32; and PARK20 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the SYNJ1 gene (OMIM ) on 21q22.PARK3 (OMIM ) has been mapped to chromosome 2p13; PARK10 (OMIM ) has been mapped to chromosome 1p34-p32; PARK16 (OMIM ) has been mapped to chromosome 1q32. See also PARK21 (OMIM ). A locus on the X chromosome has been identified (PARK12 ). There is also evidence that mitochondrial mutations may cause or contribute to Parkinson disease (see {556500}). Susceptibility to the development of the more common late-onset form of Parkinson disease has been associated with polymorphisms or mutations in several genes, including GBA (OMIM ), MAPT (OMIM ), MC1R (OMIM ), ADH1C (OMIM ), and genes at the HLA locus (see, e.g., HLA-DRA, {142860}). Each of these risk factors independently may have a modest effect on disease development, but together may have a substantial cumulative effect (Hamza et al., 2010).Susceptibility to PD may also be conferred by expanded trinucleotide repeats in several genes causing other neurologic disorders usually characterized by spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), including the ATXN2 (OMIM ), ATXN3 (OMIM ), TBP (OMIM ), and ATXN8OS (OMIM ) genes.

PARKINSON DISEASE, LATE-ONSET; PD Is also known as park

Related symptoms:

  • Ataxia
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dysarthria
  • Tremor
  • Dysphagia


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about PARKINSON DISEASE, LATE-ONSET; PD

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by dementia and parkinsonism, often with fluctuating cognitive function, visual hallucinations, falls, syncopal episodes, and sensitivity to neuroleptic medication. Pathologically, Lewy bodies are present in a pattern more widespread than usually observed in Parkinson disease (see PD; {168600}). Alzheimer disease (AD )-associated pathology and spongiform changes may also be seen (McKeith et al., 1996; Mizutani, 2000; McKeith et al., 2005).

DEMENTIA, LEWY BODY; DLB Is also known as lewy body dementia|diffuse lewy body disease

Related symptoms:

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dysarthria
  • Depressivity
  • Pneumonia
  • Dementia


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about DEMENTIA, LEWY BODY; DLB

Rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) is a very rare movement disorder, characterized by the abrupt onset of parkinsonism and dystonia, often triggered by physical or psychological stress.

RAPID-ONSET DYSTONIA-PARKINSONISM Is also known as dyt12|dystonia-parkinsonism, rapid-onset|rdp|dystonia 12

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Seizures
  • Generalized hypotonia
  • Ataxia
  • Motor delay


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about RAPID-ONSET DYSTONIA-PARKINSONISM

FAMILIAL ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH NEUROSERPIN INCLUSION BODIES Is also known as fenib|encephalopathy, familial, with collins bodies

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Nystagmus
  • Dysarthria
  • Tremor
  • Dystonia


SOURCES: MESH ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about FAMILIAL ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH NEUROSERPIN INCLUSION BODIES

Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN), also known as static encephalopathy of childhood with neurodegeneration in adulthood, is a rare form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) characterized by early-onset developmental delay and further neurological deterioration in early adulthood.

BETA-PROPELLER PROTEIN-ASSOCIATED NEURODEGENERATION Is also known as senda|beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration|static encephalopathy of childhood with neurodegeneration in adulthood|bpan|neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 5|nbia5|static encephalopathy of childhood with neurdegeneration in a

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Seizures
  • Global developmental delay
  • Spasticity
  • Dysarthria


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about BETA-PROPELLER PROTEIN-ASSOCIATED NEURODEGENERATION

HUNTINGTON DISEASE-LIKE 1 Is also known as early-onset prion disease with prominent psychiatric features|hln1|prion disease, early-onset, with prominent psychiatric features|hdl1|huntington-like neurodegenerative disorder 1|huntington-like neurodegenerative disorder, autosomal dominant

Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Generalized hypotonia
  • Ataxia
  • Nystagmus
  • Cognitive impairment


SOURCES: MESH OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about HUNTINGTON DISEASE-LIKE 1

Top 5 symptoms//phenotypes associated to Dysarthria and Gliosis

Symptoms // Phenotype % cases
Neuronal loss in central nervous system Very Common - Between 80% and 100% cases
Dementia Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Depressivity Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Bradykinesia Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Parkinsonism Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases

Other less frequent symptoms

Patients with Dysarthria and Gliosis. may also develop some of the following symptoms:

Uncommon Symptoms - Between 30% and 50% cases

Ataxia Dystonia Dysphagia Tremor Rigidity Aggressive behavior Abnormality of extrapyramidal motor function Personality changes Seizures Encephalopathy Mental deterioration Gait disturbance Cerebellar atrophy Postural instability Sleep disturbance Lewy bodies Weak voice Mask-like facies Cognitive impairment Apathy Hallucinations Alzheimer disease Memory impairment Resting tremor Anxiety Delusions Abnormality of eye movement Cerebral atrophy Frontotemporal dementia

Rare Symptoms - Less than 30% cases

Apraxia Hypotension Vertical supranuclear gaze palsy Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Abnormal autonomic nervous system physiology Restlessness Pneumonia Drooling Involuntary movements Cerebral cortical atrophy Broad-based gait Paraparesis Spastic paraparesis Nystagmus Intellectual disability Generalized hypotonia Abnormal posturing Gait ataxia Abnormality of movement Unsteady gait Dysmetria Short stepped shuffling gait Falls Behavioral abnormality Weight loss Mutism Distal sensory impairment Stereotypy Abnormal cerebellum morphology Neurodegeneration Oculogyric crisis Dysphonia Status epilepticus Epileptic encephalopathy Frequent falls Incoordination Poor fine motor coordination Abnormality of the basal ganglia Myoclonus Emotional lability Retrocollis Limb dystonia Hypomimic face Personality disorder Craniofacial dystonia Diplopia Jerky head movements Slurred speech Hyperactive deep tendon reflexes Torsion dystonia Hypokinesia Focal dystonia Basal ganglia gliosis Slow saccadic eye movements Clumsiness Aspiration Spastic paraplegia Iron accumulation in brain Mania Abnormality of the shoulder Iron accumulation in substantia nigra Abnormal saccadic eye movements Abnormality of higher mental function Jerky ocular pursuit movements Frontal release signs Progressive encephalopathy Paraplegia Poor speech Abnormality of ocular smooth pursuit Chorea Delayed speech and language development Absent speech Global brain atrophy Optic atrophy Spasticity Ventriculomegaly Abnormal head movements Global developmental delay Eyelid myoclonus Perseveration Aspiration pneumonia EEG abnormality Torticollis Abnormal pyramidal sign Progressive neurologic deterioration Distal sensory impairment of all modalities Respiratory failure Abnormality of metabolism/homeostasis Respiratory insufficiency Violent behavior Hyperorality Paranoia Auditory hallucinations Bowel incontinence Impulsivity Urinary incontinence Gait instability, worse in the dark Distal sensory loss of all modalities Insomnia Positive Romberg sign Sensory ataxia Peripheral demyelination Babinski sign Hyporeflexia Areflexia Congestive heart failure Astrocytosis Axonal loss Athetosis Paralysis Pallor Hypoventilation Gait imbalance Progressive cerebellar ataxia Muscle stiffness Inability to walk Intellectual disability, mild Hypertonia Fever Hyperreflexia Motor delay Fluctuations in consciousness Senile plaques Supranuclear gaze palsy Visual hallucinations Neurofibrillary tangles Loss of consciousness Syncope Respiratory arrest Dyskinesia Confusion Ophthalmoplegia Micrographia Substantia nigra gliosis Kinetic tremor Orthostatic hypotension Urinary urgency Stroke Constipation Inappropriate behavior Central hypoventilation Simultanapraxia


If you liked this article maybe you will also find interesting the following in-depth articles about other rare diseases, like Intrauterine growth retardation and Prominent nose, related diseases and genetic alterations