Anemia, and Cataract

Diseases related with Anemia and Cataract

In the following list you will find some of the most common rare diseases related to Anemia and Cataract that can help you solving undiagnosed cases.


Top matches:

Low match CATARACT 36; CTRCT36


CATARACT 36; CTRCT36 Is also known as cataract, autosomal recessive congenital 4|catc4

Related symptoms:

  • Cataract


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about CATARACT 36; CTRCT36

Low match HEREDITARY HYPERFERRITINEMIA-CATARACT SYNDROME


Hereditary hyperferritinemia with congenital cataracts is characterized by the association of early onset (although generally absent at birth) cataract with persistently raised plasma ferritin concentrations in the absence of iron overload.

HEREDITARY HYPERFERRITINEMIA-CATARACT SYNDROME Is also known as hereditary hyperferritinemia with congenital cataracts|bonneau-beaumont syndrome|hhcs

Related symptoms:

  • Cataract
  • Abnormality of metabolism/homeostasis


SOURCES: ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about HEREDITARY HYPERFERRITINEMIA-CATARACT SYNDROME

Low match BLOOD GROUP, SS; SS


Ss blood group antigens reside on the red-cell glycoprotein GYPB. The S and s antigens result from a polymorphism at amino acid 29 of GYPB, where S has met29 and s has thr29. The U antigen refers to a short extracellular sequence in GYPB located near the membrane. GYPB, glycophorin A (GYPA ), and glycophorin E (GYPE ) are closely linked on chromosome 4q31. Antigens of the MN blood group (OMIM ) reside on GYPA. The M and N antigens differ at amino acids 1 and 5 of GYPA, where M is ser-ser-thr-thr-gly, and N is leu-ser-thr-thr-glu. The N terminus of GYPB is essentially identical to that of GYPA except that it always expresses the N antigen, denoted 'N' or N-prime. Recombination and gene conversion between GYPA, GYPB, and GYPE lead to hybrid glycophorin molecules and generation of low-incidence antigens. Thus, the MN and Ss blood groups are together referred to as the MNSs blood group system (see {111300}). Recombination results in 3 glycophorin-null phenotypes: En(a-) cells lack GYPA due to recombination between GYPA and GYPB; GYPB-negative (S-s-U-) cells lack GYPB due to recombination in GYPB; and M(k) cells (M-N-S-s-U-) lack both GYPA and GYPB due to recombination between GYPA and GYPE. Individuals with glycophorin-null phenotypes have decreased sialic acid content and increased resistance to malarial infection (see {611162}). GYPA and GYPB are not essential for red-cell development or survival, and GYPA- and GYPB-null phenotypes are not associated with anemia or altered red-cell function (review by Cooling, 2015).

BLOOD GROUP, SS; SS Is also known as ss blood group

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Anemia


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about BLOOD GROUP, SS; SS

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Other less relevant matches:

Low match DIAMOND-BLACKFAN ANEMIA 17; DBA17


Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Hyperpigmentation of the skin


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about DIAMOND-BLACKFAN ANEMIA 17; DBA17

Low match L-FERRITIN DEFICIENCY


Related symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Cataract
  • Anemia
  • Alopecia
  • Generalized-onset seizure


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about L-FERRITIN DEFICIENCY

Low match 3-PHOSPHOGLYCERATE DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY, INFANTILE/JUVENILE FORM


3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency (3-PGDH deficiency) is an autosomal recessive form of serine deficiency syndrome (see this term) characterized clinically in the few reported cases by congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation and intractable seizures in the infantile form and by absence seizures, moderate developmental delay and behavioral disorders in the juvenile form

3-PHOSPHOGLYCERATE DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY, INFANTILE/JUVENILE FORM Is also known as phgdh deficiency

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Seizures
  • Global developmental delay
  • Microcephaly
  • Growth delay


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MESH MENDELIAN

More info about 3-PHOSPHOGLYCERATE DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY, INFANTILE/JUVENILE FORM

Low match BLOOD GROUP, MN; MN


MN antigens reside on GYPA, one of the most abundant red-cell glycoproteins. The M and N antigens are 2 autosomal codominant antigens encoded by the first 5 amino acids of GYPA and include 3 O-linked glycans as part of the epitope. M and N differ at amino acids 1 and 5, where M is ser-ser-thr-thr-gly, and N is leu-ser-thr-thr-glu. M is the ancestral GYPA allele and is common in all human populations and Old World apes. GYPA, glycophorin B (GYPB ), and glycophorin E (GYPE ) are closely linked on chromosome 4q31. The N terminus of GYPB is essentially identical to that of GYPA except that it always expresses the N antigen, denoted 'N' or N-prime. Antigens of the Ss blood group (OMIM ) reside on GYPB, and recombination and gene conversion between GYPA, GYPB, and GYPE lead to hybrid glycophorin molecules and generation of low-incidence antigens. Thus, the MN and Ss blood groups are together referred to as the MNSs or MNS blood group system. The U antigen refers to a short extracellular sequence in GYPB located near the membrane. Recombination results in 3 glycophorin-null phenotypes: En(a-) cells lack GYPA due to recombination between GYPA and GYPB; GYPB-negative (S-s-U-) cells lack GYPB due to recombination in GYPB; and M(k) cells (M-N-S-s-U-) lack both GYPA and GYPB due to recombination between GYPA and GYPE. Individuals with glycophorin-null phenotypes have decreased sialic acid content and increased resistance to malarial infection (see {611162}). GYPA and GYPB are not essential for red-cell development or survival, and GYPA- and GYPB-null phenotypes are not associated with anemia or altered red-cell function (review by Cooling, 2015).

BLOOD GROUP, MN; MN Is also known as mn blood group

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Anemia
  • Leukemia


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about BLOOD GROUP, MN; MN

Low match HEMOCHROMATOSIS TYPE 4


Hemochromatosis type 4 (also called ferroportin disease) is a form of rare hereditary hemochromatosis (HH; see this term), a group of diseases characterized by excessive tissue iron deposition of genetic origin.

HEMOCHROMATOSIS TYPE 4 Is also known as autosomal dominant hereditary hemochromatosis|hemochromatosis due to defect in ferroportin|hemochromatosis, autosomal dominant|ferroportin disease

Related symptoms:

  • Pain
  • Cataract
  • Anemia
  • Fatigue
  • Respiratory distress


SOURCES: ORPHANET MESH OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about HEMOCHROMATOSIS TYPE 4

Low match BONE MARROW FAILURE SYNDROME 4; BMFS4


BMFS4 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset anemia, leukopenia, and decreased B cells, resulting in the necessity for red cell transfusion and sometimes causing an increased susceptibility to infection. Some patients may have thrombocytopenia or variable additional nonhematologic features, such as facial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and mild developmental delay. Bone marrow transplantation is curative (summary by Bahrami et al., 2017).For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (OMIM ).

Related symptoms:

  • Global developmental delay
  • Short stature
  • Hearing impairment
  • Microcephaly
  • Abnormal facial shape


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about BONE MARROW FAILURE SYNDROME 4; BMFS4

Low match HEREDITARY CRYOHYDROCYTOSIS WITH REDUCED STOMATIN


Hereditary cryohydrocytosis with reduced stomatin is a rare hemolytic anemia characterized by combination of neurologic features, such as psychomotor delay, seizures, variable movement disorders, and hemolytic anemia with stomatocytosis, resulting in cation-leaky erythrocytes, pseudohyperkalemia, hemolytic crises and hepatosplenomegaly. Cataracts are also a presenting feature.

HEREDITARY CRYOHYDROCYTOSIS WITH REDUCED STOMATIN Is also known as cryohydrocytosis, stomatin-deficient, with mental retardation, seizures, cataracts, and massive hepatosplenomegaly|hereditary cryohydrocytosis type 2|sdchc|stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis|chc type 2|glut1 deficiency syndrome with pseudohyperkalemia an

Related symptoms:

  • Intellectual disability
  • Seizures
  • Global developmental delay
  • Short stature
  • Microcephaly


SOURCES: ORPHANET MESH OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about HEREDITARY CRYOHYDROCYTOSIS WITH REDUCED STOMATIN

Top 5 symptoms//phenotypes associated to Anemia and Cataract

Symptoms // Phenotype % cases
Seizures Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases
Microcephaly Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases
Global developmental delay Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases
Intellectual disability Rare - less than 30% cases
Thrombocytopenia Rare - less than 30% cases
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Other less frequent symptoms

Patients with Anemia and Cataract. may also develop some of the following symptoms:

Rare Symptoms - Less than 30% cases


Hypertonia Cardiomyopathy Nystagmus Short stature Neoplasm Increased serum ferritin Eczema Neurodevelopmental delay Hyperreflexia Spasticity Ataxia Noncompaction cardiomyopathy Agammaglobulinemia Upper limb undergrowth Lymphopenia Recurrent upper respiratory tract infections Leukopenia Rhizomelia Gingival overgrowth Respiratory tract infection Dry skin Choanal atresia Neutropenia Hepatomegaly Macrotia Brachydactyly Hemolytic anemia Zonular cataract Hemoglobinuria Stomatocytosis Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia Broad neck Hyperkalemia Hyperbilirubinemia Delayed myelination Inability to walk Macrocephaly Paraplegia Spastic paraplegia Hepatosplenomegaly Jaundice Recurrent infections Absent speech Splenomegaly Hydrocephalus Midface retrusion Joint swelling Abnormality of the skeletal system Decreased testicular size Leukemia Cerebral dysmyelination Congenital microcephaly Megaloblastic anemia Adducted thumb Hypsarrhythmia Spastic tetraplegia Congenital cataract Fatigue Postnatal growth retardation Hypogonadism Growth delay Restless legs Iron deficiency anemia Generalized-onset seizure Alopecia Hyperpigmentation of the skin Pain Respiratory distress Low-set ears Joint dislocation Abnormal facial shape Hearing impairment Congenital hepatic fibrosis Abnormality of metabolism/homeostasis Generalized hyperpigmentation Impotence Glucose intolerance Hepatic fibrosis Arrhythmia Osteoarthritis Limitation of joint mobility Hepatic steatosis Cirrhosis Scarring Abnormality of the liver Arthralgia Abdominal pain Hypoglycorrhachia



If you liked this article maybe you will also find interesting the following in-depth articles about other rare diseases, like Hepatomegaly and Hirsutism, related diseases and genetic alterations Immunodeficiency and Dilatation, related diseases and genetic alterations Cognitive impairment and Pheochromocytoma, related diseases and genetic alterations Peripheral neuropathy and Telangiectasia, related diseases and genetic alterations Anemia and Osteopenia, related diseases and genetic alterations

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