Anemia, and Acute myeloid leukemia

Diseases related with Anemia and Acute myeloid leukemia

In the following list you will find some of the most common rare diseases related to Anemia and Acute myeloid leukemia that can help you solving undiagnosed cases.


Top matches:

High match BLOOD GROUP, MN; MN


MN antigens reside on GYPA, one of the most abundant red-cell glycoproteins. The M and N antigens are 2 autosomal codominant antigens encoded by the first 5 amino acids of GYPA and include 3 O-linked glycans as part of the epitope. M and N differ at amino acids 1 and 5, where M is ser-ser-thr-thr-gly, and N is leu-ser-thr-thr-glu. M is the ancestral GYPA allele and is common in all human populations and Old World apes. GYPA, glycophorin B (GYPB ), and glycophorin E (GYPE ) are closely linked on chromosome 4q31. The N terminus of GYPB is essentially identical to that of GYPA except that it always expresses the N antigen, denoted 'N' or N-prime. Antigens of the Ss blood group (OMIM ) reside on GYPB, and recombination and gene conversion between GYPA, GYPB, and GYPE lead to hybrid glycophorin molecules and generation of low-incidence antigens. Thus, the MN and Ss blood groups are together referred to as the MNSs or MNS blood group system. The U antigen refers to a short extracellular sequence in GYPB located near the membrane. Recombination results in 3 glycophorin-null phenotypes: En(a-) cells lack GYPA due to recombination between GYPA and GYPB; GYPB-negative (S-s-U-) cells lack GYPB due to recombination in GYPB; and M(k) cells (M-N-S-s-U-) lack both GYPA and GYPB due to recombination between GYPA and GYPE. Individuals with glycophorin-null phenotypes have decreased sialic acid content and increased resistance to malarial infection (see {611162}). GYPA and GYPB are not essential for red-cell development or survival, and GYPA- and GYPB-null phenotypes are not associated with anemia or altered red-cell function (review by Cooling, 2015).

BLOOD GROUP, MN; MN Is also known as mn blood group

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Anemia
  • Leukemia


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about BLOOD GROUP, MN; MN

Medium match MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROME; MDS


Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of clonal hematologic stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in low blood counts, most commonly anemia, and a risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML ). Blood smears and bone marrow biopsies show dysplastic changes in myeloid cells, with abnormal proliferation and differentiation of 1 or more lineages (erythroid, myeloid, megakaryocytic). MDS can be subdivided into several categories based on morphologic characteristics, such as low-grade refractory anemia (RA) or high-grade refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB). Bone marrow biopsies of some patients show ringed sideroblasts (RARS), which reflects abnormal iron staining in mitochondria surrounding the nucleus of erythrocyte progenitors (summary by Delhommeau et al., 2009 and Papaemmanuil et al., 2011).

MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROME; MDS Is also known as myelodysplastic syndrome, susceptibility to, included

Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Leukemia
  • Myelodysplasia
  • Myeloid leukemia
  • Acute myeloid leukemia


SOURCES: OMIM ORPHANET MENDELIAN

More info about MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROME; MDS

Medium match ERYTHROLEUKEMIA, FAMILIAL


Familial erythroleukemia is a leukemic or preleukemic state in which red cell proliferation is the predominant feature. Hematologic characteristics include particularly ineffective and hyperplastic erythropoiesis with megaloblastic components accompanied by myeloblastic proliferation of varying degree (Park et al., 2002).Park et al. (2002) discussed the evolution of the definition of 'erythroleukemia,' which is considered by most to be a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML ). Controversy about the precise definition of erythroleukemia revolves around the number or percentage of erythroblasts and myeloblasts found in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation. In the French-American-British (FAB) classification system (Bennett et al., 1985), it is known as AML-M6, whereas in the revised World Health Organization (WHO) classification system (Harris et al., 1999), it is known as 'AML, not otherwise categorized' (Zini and D'Onofrio, 2004).

ERYTHROLEUKEMIA, FAMILIAL Is also known as di guglielmo disease, familial|leukemia, acute myelogenous, m6

Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Leukemia
  • Leukopenia
  • Myelodysplasia
  • Acute myeloid leukemia


SOURCES: OMIM MESH MENDELIAN

More info about ERYTHROLEUKEMIA, FAMILIAL

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Other less relevant matches:

Medium match TN POLYAGGLUTINATION SYNDROME; TNPS


Polyagglutination refers to red blood cells that agglutinate upon exposure to almost all human sera, but not to autologous serum or the sera of newborns. The condition becomes apparent during blood typing and cross-matching in the laboratory (summary by Beck, 2000).Tn polyagglutination syndrome is an acquired clonal disorder characterized by the polyagglutination of red blood cells by naturally occurring anti-Tn antibodies following exposure of the Tn antigen on the surface of erythrocytes. Only a subset of red cells express the antigen, which can also be expressed on platelets and leukocytes. This condition may occur in healthy individuals who manifest asymptomatic anemia, leukopenia, or thrombocytopenia; however, there is also an association between the Tn antigen and leukemia or myelodysplastic disorders. The Tn antigen is an incompletely glycosylated membrane glycoprotein with an exposed N-acetylgalactosamine residue. The Tn antigen results from inactivation of C1GALT1C1, which encodes a chaperone required for the correct functioning of T-synthetase (C1GALT1 ), an enzyme essential for the correct biosynthesis of O-glycans. Absence of active T-synthetase results in exposure of GalNAc residues, with a proportion of these residues becoming sialylated and forming a sialyl-Tn antigen (summary by Vainchenker et al., 1985 and Crew et al., 2008).

TN POLYAGGLUTINATION SYNDROME; TNPS Is also known as galactosyltransferase deficiency

Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Thrombocytopenia
  • Autoimmunity
  • Leukemia
  • Hemolytic anemia


SOURCES: MESH OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about TN POLYAGGLUTINATION SYNDROME; TNPS

Medium match DDX41-RELATED HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCY PREDISPOSITION SYNDROME


Familial myeloproliferative/lymphoproliferative neoplasms is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by adult-onset of hematologic malignancies mainly affecting the myeloid line. Most patients present with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS ) and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML ). Rare lymphoid malignancies, including lymphoma, can also occur. Some mutation carriers, even if unaffected by a hematologic malignancy, may have evidence of immune dysregulation disorders, including asthma, eczema, or juvenile arthritis. The disorder shows incomplete penetrance (summary by Lewinsohn et al., 2016). Patients may show a favorable response to treatment with lenalidomide (summary by Polprasert et al., 2015).

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Anemia
  • Arthritis
  • Leukemia
  • Asthma


SOURCES: ORPHANET OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about DDX41-RELATED HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCY PREDISPOSITION SYNDROME

Medium match PULMONARY FIBROSIS AND/OR BONE MARROW FAILURE, TELOMERE-RELATED, 1; PFBMFT1


Shortened telomeres can cause a wide variety of clinical features that constitute a phenotypic spectrum. The most severe form is dyskeratosis congenita (see, e.g., {127750}), characterized by early childhood onset of skin abnormalities, bone marrow failure, predisposition to malignancy, and risk of pulmonary and hepatic fibrosis. Adult-onset pulmonary fibrosis is the most common manifestation of mutant telomerase genes. Other manifestations include aplastic anemia due to bone marrow failure, hepatic fibrosis, and increased cancer risk, particularly myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Phenotype, age at onset, and severity are determined by telomere length, not just telomerase mutation (summary by Armanios, 2009).The genetic diagnosis of telomere-related bone marrow failure and pulmonary fibrosis has implications for treatment because affected individuals generally do not respond to immunosuppression and may be at increased risk for fatal complications after bone marrow or lung transplantation (Parry et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Telomere-Related Pulmonary Fibrosis and/or Bone Marrow FailureAlso see PFBMFT2 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the TERC gene (OMIM ) on chromosome 3q26; PFBMFT3 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the RTEL1 gene (OMIM ) on chromosome 20q13; and PFBMFT4 (OMIM ), caused by mutation in the PARN gene (OMIM ) on chromosome 16p13.

Related symptoms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Anemia
  • Thrombocytopenia
  • Pneumonia
  • Dyspnea


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about PULMONARY FIBROSIS AND/OR BONE MARROW FAILURE, TELOMERE-RELATED, 1; PFBMFT1

Medium match JUVENILE MYELOMONOCYTIC LEUKEMIA


Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is an aggressive pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) characterized by malignant transformation in the hematopoietic stem cell compartment with proliferation of differentiated progeny (Loh et al., 2009). JMML constitutes approximately 30% of childhood cases of myelodysplastic syndrome and 2% of leukemia (Hasle et al., 1999). Although JMML is a progressive and often rapidly fatal disease without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), some patients have been shown to have a prolonged and stable clinical course without HSCT (Niemeyer et al., 1997). Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a similar disorder with later onset. Both JMML and CMML have a high frequency of mutations affecting the RAS signaling pathway and show hypersensitivity to stimulation with GM-CSF, which causes STAT5 (OMIM ) hyperphosphorylation (Loh et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Juvenile Myelomonocytic LeukemiaIn up to 60% of cases of JMML, the RAS/MAPK pathway is deregulated due to somatic mutations in the PTPN11 (OMIM ), KRAS (OMIM ), and NRAS (OMIM ) genes. Additionally, both germline and somatic mutations in the CBL gene have been found in patients with JMML, indicating a frequency of 10 to 15% of JMML patients overall (Loh et al., 2009). Somatic disruptions of the GRAF gene (ARHGAP26 ) have also been found in patients with JMML.About 10 to 15% of JMML cases arise in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1 ) due to germline mutations in the NF1 gene (OMIM ). In addition, patients with Noonan syndrome (NS1, {163950}; NS3, {609942}) or Noonan syndrome-like disorder (NSLL ) due to germline mutations in the PTPN11, KRAS2, and CBL genes, respectively, also have an increased risk of developing JMML. Genetic Heterogeneity of Chronic Myelomonocytic LeukemiaSomatic mutations in the CBL, ASXL1 (OMIM ), TET2 (OMIM ), and SF3B1 (OMIM ) genes have been found in patients with CMML.

JUVENILE MYELOMONOCYTIC LEUKEMIA Is also known as juvenile chronic myelomonocytic leukemia|jmml|leukemia, juvenile myelomonocytic

Related symptoms:

  • Generalized hypotonia
  • Abnormal facial shape
  • Anemia
  • Anteverted nares
  • Splenomegaly


SOURCES: ORPHANET MESH OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about JUVENILE MYELOMONOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

Medium match FANCONI ANEMIA, COMPLEMENTATION GROUP T; FANCT


Fanconi anemia is characterized by genomic instability, increased susceptibility to cancer development, and bone marrow failure associated with various developmental abnormalities, such as radial ray anomalies or short stature (summary by Hira et al., 2015).For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fanconi anemia, see FANCA (OMIM ).

Related symptoms:

  • Short stature
  • Neoplasm
  • Anemia
  • Thrombocytopenia
  • Polydactyly


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about FANCONI ANEMIA, COMPLEMENTATION GROUP T; FANCT

Medium match PLATELET DISORDER, FAMILIAL, WITH ASSOCIATED MYELOID MALIGNANCY; FPDMM


PLATELET DISORDER, FAMILIAL, WITH ASSOCIATED MYELOID MALIGNANCY; FPDMM Is also known as platelet disorder, aspirin-like|thrombocytopenia, familial, with propensity to acute myelogenous leukemia|fpd/aml

Related symptoms:

  • Anemia
  • Thrombocytopenia
  • Hernia
  • Hypospadias
  • Umbilical hernia


SOURCES: OMIM MENDELIAN

More info about PLATELET DISORDER, FAMILIAL, WITH ASSOCIATED MYELOID MALIGNANCY; FPDMM

Top 5 symptoms//phenotypes associated to Anemia and Acute myeloid leukemia

Symptoms // Phenotype % cases
Leukemia Very Common - Between 80% and 100% cases
Myelodysplasia Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Acute monocytic leukemia Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Myeloid leukemia Common - Between 50% and 80% cases
Thrombocytopenia Uncommon - Between 30% and 50% cases
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Other less frequent symptoms

Patients with Anemia and Acute myeloid leukemia. may also develop some of the following symptoms:

Uncommon Symptoms - Between 30% and 50% cases


Refractory anemia Bone marrow hypocellularity Neoplasm Leukopenia Pancytopenia

Rare Symptoms - Less than 30% cases


Monocytosis Interstitial pulmonary abnormality Premature graying of hair Pulmonary fibrosis Hepatic fibrosis Abnormal lung morphology Cirrhosis Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia Aplastic anemia Lymphoma Immune dysregulation Umbilical hernia Short stature Polydactyly Facial palsy Short thumb Preaxial hand polydactyly Duplication of thumb phalanx Hernia Hypospadias Bruising susceptibility Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia Neutropenia Abnormal bleeding Epistaxis Purpura Prolonged bleeding time Neuroblastoma Acute lymphoblastic leukemia Acute leukemia Acute myelomonocytic leukemia Myeloproliferative disorder Systemic lupus erythematosus Refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts Melanoma Erythroid dysplasia Eczema Asthma Arthritis Abnormal erythrocyte morphology Hemolytic anemia Autoimmunity Pneumonia Facial hypotonia Dyspnea Cough Generalized hypotonia Abnormal facial shape Anteverted nares Splenomegaly Narrow mouth Neurofibromas Impaired platelet aggregation



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